Phone: (561) 840-1090
Fax: (561) 840-0791

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Elbow Dislocations and Fractures

You can injure your elbow in a variety of ways, from overuse (athletic injuries) to an acute traumatic event (a fall or direct blow). When the joint surfaces of an elbow are separated, the elbow is dislocated. Elbow dislocations can be complete or partial. In a complete dislocation, the joint surfaces are completely separated. In a partial dislocation, the joint surfaces are only partly separated. A partial dislocation is also called a subluxation.

Elbow dislocations are not common. Elbow dislocations typically occur when a person falls onto an outstretched hand. When the hand hits the ground, the force is sent to the elbow. Usually, there is a turning motion in this force. This can drive and rotate the elbow out of its socket. Elbow dislocations can also happen in car accidents when the passengers reach forward to cushion the impact. The force that is sent through the arm can dislocate the elbow, just as in a fall.

If your elbow shows any of the following signs you may have a fracture or another injury that needs medical attention:

  • Swelling of your elbow or in the area immediately above or below your elbow
  • Deformity of your elbow
  • Discoloration, such as bruising or redness of your elbow
  • Difficulty moving your
  • Numbness, decreased sensation, or a cool sensation of your forearm, hand, or fingers
  • Three major nerves-the median, radial, and ulnar nerves-travel through your elbow. A serious injury may damage these nerves.
  • Many blood vessels also pass through your elbow. These important vessels may become injured or compressed when trauma or swelling occurs.
  • A cut, or open wound, on the elbow after a traumatic injury
  • Severe pain after an elbow injury
  • A “tight sensation” in the area of your elbow or forearm

An elbow fracture carries the risk of potentially serious and disabling complications. If you think your elbow may be fractured please give our officer a call at (561) 840-1090